New Brunswick

Intervener status granted to 4 parties in Dennis Oland bail appeal

The Supreme Court of Canada has granted intervener status in Dennis Oland's appeal of his bail denial to three provinces and a lawyers association.

Supreme Court agrees to let 3 other attorneys general and a criminal lawyers group submit written arguments

Dennis Oland's appeal of being denied bail while appealing his second-degree murder conviction is to be heard by the Supreme Court of Canada on Oct. 31. (CBC)

The Supreme Court of Canada has granted intervener status in Dennis Oland's appeal of his bail denial to three provinces and a lawyers association.

The attorneys general of Ontario, British Columbia and Alberta and the Criminal Lawyers' Association (Ontario) had applied to intervene in the case.

The court granted them intervener status and entitled them to each serve submit a statement of not more than 10 pages before Oct. 14.

Requests from the interveners to present oral arguments in the case were deferred until the written arguments of the parties and the interveners can be considered.

Oland's lawyers had opposed the motions to intervene by the three attorneys general, saying they "have no different or greater expertise" than the New Brunswick attorney general, which is a party in the case.

Oland is appealing decisions in New Brunswick courts that denied him to be freed on bail pending his appeal of his conviction for second-degree murder in the 2011 death of his father, multimillionaire Saint John businessman Richard Oland.

Court of Appeal Justice J.C. Marc Richard rejected Oland's bail request, ruling "the confidence of the public in the administration of justice would be undermined" if a convicted murderer were to be released pending appeal.

A three-justice panel of the Court of Appeal later upheld that decision. Oland then sought leave to appeal the decision to the country's highest court, which agreed to hear the case.

Arguments are scheduled to be heard by the Supreme Court on Oct. 31.

Meanwhile, Oland's appeal of his conviction is scheduled to be heard by the New Brunswick Court of Appeal on Oct. 18 to 20.

now