New Brunswick

Cool weather means early apple picking

The first frost has already settled in many parts of New Brunswick, and that means many are preparing to pick the first apples of the season. Marieka Chaplin and her husband Phil own and operate Sandow Farms in Keswick Ridge. They’re open for picking this Saturday.

Sandow Farms will be opening their U-Pick this Saturday

Sandow Farms in Keswick Ridge will be selling Sandow apples that resist bruising, making them perfect for their organic farm. (Elizabeth Hostland)

The first frost has already settled in many parts of New Brunswick, and that means many are preparing to pick the first apples of the season.

Marieka Chaplin, and her husband Phil, own and operate Sandow Farms in Keswick Ridge. They're open for picking this Saturday.

"We have had a wonderful growing season, we are very excited and are looking forward to a fantastic harvest," she said.

Marieka Chaplin of Sandow Farm in Keswick Ridge says it's been a great growing season and they're ready t open the u-pick this weekend! 7:02

The farm is named after a specific variety of apple grown on at the orchard, one that suits their organic farm.

"The sandow is an older variety, works very well on our farms because it's scab resistant … scab is one of those troubling fungal issues with apples that tend to lead towards having to spray."

"It's a very versatile apple," said Chaplin."The apple sweetens as it stores, so it makes a wonderful winter storing apple."

It's good for cooking and baking, and can be stored until as late as May.

Sandow apples also ripen with frost, and that means an early season for Chaplin and her customers.

Something new

This year the orchard began growing heritage apples that aren't common to most pickers.

These include a few Princess Louise and William's Pride varieties.

"They're [William's Pride] such a unique looking apple, with pink flesh on the inside of the skin, and they don't brown."

But these special apples aren't ready to be harvested, Chaplin said. They will have enough to sell in future seasons.

Real Food Connections in Fredericton is also making use of Chaplin's apples. The jelly to sell at the orchard is being cooked up in their kitchens.

"We will have it for sale at the farm… we try to pick some sweeter apples for the jelly so typically we use crab apples," said Chaplin.

Sandow Farms will be introducing a weekend barbecue with locally sourced food to their U-Pick this year to keep people fed while they're roaming around picking their apples.
 

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