Community

Information Morning shows in N.B. and N.S. team up for Earth Day

Climate change and the resulting rise in sea level are about to get real for communities along the Crossroads, the low-lying area between Nova Scotia and New Brunswick. This vital transportation corridor is the only land route between Nova Scotia and the rest of Canada.

Jonna Brewer and Portia Clark examine sea level rise along vital transport corridor between Maritime provinces

Saint Mary's University Converse Marsh restoration project near Amherst, N.S. (ThreeSixFive Media )

On Thursday, April 22 — Earth Day — Information Morning shows in New Brunswick and Nova Scotia joined forces for At the Crossroads, a special program dedicated to discussing the impact of sea level rise on the Chignecto Isthmus, the key piece of land connecting the two provinces. 

The show explored the area's history and ways to protect this threatened land from the effects of climate change, including impacts to towns, farmlands and the major transportation corridor along the Nova Scotia-New Brunswick border.

Listen now to find out about what's at stake and what governments and citizens can do to address this looming crisis. 

HOUR ONE - AT THE CROSSROADS

This is an extended version of the first hour of our program, "At the Crossroads: Sea level rise in the Chignecto Isthmus." It's a joint production by Information Morning in Halifax and Moncton. In this first hour, you'll hear interviews about the history of the isthmus, and why the strip of land between Nova Scotia and New Brunswick is so vulnerable to climate change. 1:36:31
  • Trevor Gould, the curatorial assistant for the Mi'kmawey Debert Cultural Centre, began the special program by talking about the 13,000-year history of Siknikt, which translates in English to "the drainage area." You can hear his interview beginning at 6:06.
  • Ronnie-Gilles LeBlanc is an Acadian historian whose ancestors settled in Beaubassin. He explained how the Acadians constructed an intricate system of dikes and aboiteaux. You can hear his interview beginning at the 15:08 mark.
  • Ernest Partridge, a retired aboiteau superintendent, shared some of his memories of working to repair and maintain the dikes and aboiteaux with the Maritime Marshland Reclamation Administration. You can hear his account beginning at 41:17.
  • CBC meteorologist Tina Simpkin gives an overview of how climate change, and sea level rise in particular, are threatening the Chignecto Isthmus. You can hear her report beginning at 47:00.
  • Tim Webster is a research scientist with the Applied Geomatics Research Group at Nova Scotia Community College. He talks about some of the assessments he's done of coastal flood risk in the Chignecto Isthmus. You can hear his interview beginning at 55:15.
  • Mike Johnson, the regional emergency management coordinator for Nova Scotia's Cumberland County, and Terry Murphy, EMO coordinator in Port Elgin, N.B., talked about some of the storms they've witnessed and what worries them about sea level rise. You can hear their interview at the 1:10:46

HOUR TWO - AT THE CROSSROADS

This is an extended version of the second hour of our program, "At the Crossroads: Sea level rise in the Chignecto Isthmus," a joint production by Information Morning in Halifax and Moncton. In this hour, we hear from a third-generation farmer who is worried about flooding, as well as officials in Amherst and Sackville, and researchers at Saint Mary's University who are working on a nature-based method to deal with sea level rise. 1:06:27
  • Third-generation farmer John Atkinson invited Portia Clark to his farm near Amherst to show her how close the powerful Bay of Fundy has come to his property. You can hear their conversation at the 1:15 mark.
  • Jamie Burke, the CAO of Sackville, talked about how much of the town is located in the floodplain. You can hear his interview beginning at 7:25.
  • Mayor David Kogon in Amherst talked about his concern for his community and what kind of support he's hoping to see from the federal and provincial governments. You can hear his interview beginning at 18:10.
  • Saint Mary's University researchers Danika van Proosdij and Makadunyiswe Ngulube talk about how nature-based solutions could help deal with sea level rise in the Chignecto area. You can hear their interview beginning at 32:32.
  • Jeff Ollerhead is a coastal geo-morphologist at Mount Allison University in New Brunswick who has been looking at solutions for flooding in the Tantramar Marshes at the head of the Cumberland Basin. You can learn more beginning at 41:25
  • Mike Pauley, the assistant director of the New Brunswick Highway Corporation, is leading a $700,000 federal and provincial study looking at ways to protect the Trans Canada Highway from flooding. You can hear his interview at the 45:17 mark.

HOUR THREE - AT THE CROSSROADS

This is an extended version of the third hour of our program, "At the Crossroads: Sea level rise in the Chignecto Isthmus." It's a joint production by Information Morning in Halifax and Moncton. In this final half hour, we look at what people are doing to combat climate change. You'll hear from Amanda Marlin with EOS Eco-Energy, climate change activist Chaz Carraway and high school students Quinn McAskill and Dan Osborne. 32:46
  • Amanda Marlin with EOS Eco-Energy Inc. talks about what you can do to combat climate change. You can hear her interview beginning at the 1:30 mark.
  • Chaz Garraway, from Nassau in the Bahamas, is a climate change activist and student at Dalhousie who plans to focus his career on climate adaptation. You can hear his interview beginning at 15:10.
  • High school students Quinn McAskill and Dan Osborne wrapped up the show by sharing their thoughts for the future. You can hear their conversation beginning at 17:00.

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