New Brunswick

N.B. blockades come down 72 hours after CN Rail wins injunction to stop demonstrators

Wet'suwet'en supporters who set up blockades at CN Rail's tracks in Moncton on Friday and later near Harcourt have left the sites after being served with a court order.

Injunction bars protesters from 'trespassing' near any CN rail line in the province

Demonstrators have dismantled two blockades on CN Rail lines in the province. (Tori Weldon/CBC)

Wet'suwet'en supporters who set up blockades at CN Rail's tracks in Moncton on Friday and later near Harcourt have left the sites after being served with a court order.

The injunction was issued on Friday when a group of about a dozen people from Elsipogtog First Nation other parts of the Maritimes placed signs across the tracks at the Caledonia Industrial Park that read, "Protecting next 7 generations," "No pipeline," and "Elsipogtog supports Wet'suwet'en."

The Court of Queen's Bench granted the injunction, which says demonstrators will be restrained from "trespassing on any CN's railway at or near…Caledonia Industrial Park, or anywhere else on any CN railway in the province of New Brunswick."

The order goes on to warn against impeding or restricting in any way CN's ability to carry on its business, including "threatening or intimidating CN's employees, servants, agents or other persons having business with CN."

The order says anyone with knowledge of the injunction can be arrested and removed by police.

Supporters also had a blockade set up along the tracks in Harcourt, about 55 kilometres northwest of Moncton.

John Levi, a warrior chief from Elsipogtog First Nation, said they were warned about the injunction on Friday.

New Brunswick's Court of Queen's Bench issued a court order on Friday, prohibiting anyone from trespassing on CN's railways across the province, or impeding the operation of services. (CBC)

"The CN cops delivered the court injunction here the same night we set up," said Levi.

"We told them we were planning on having this for 72 hours and we're going to stick to the plan."

Levi said now that the 72 hours are over, demonstrators plan to regroup and wait for the Elsipogtog grandmothers to decide what to do next.

"We support them 100 per cent," said Levi.

'Can't trust them'

Levi said the RCMP were on site throughout much of the 72 hours.

He said officers help protect demonstrators from "haters" who would drive by the blockade. Still, Levi made clear he didn't support the way the force has dealt with this whole situation.

John Levi, a warrior chief from Elsipogtog First Nation, said now the 72 hours are over demonstrators plan to regroup and wait for the Elsipogtog grandmothers to decide what to do next. (Tori Weldon/CBC)

"The RCMP's one body, one brain and one goal is to protect the interest of the settlers, the corporations," said Levi.

"You can't trust them."

A hearing is scheduled for Tuesday afternoon to hear a motion to continue the injunction.

CBC News has reached out to CN and the RCMP for comment but have yet to receive a reply.

The blockades were put up by supporters of Wet'suwet'en hereditary chiefs who are trying to keep RCMP officers off their unceded territory in northern British Columbia.

The RCMP are enforcing an injunction against the chiefs filed by the owners of the proposed Coastal GasLink pipeline. The pipeline has support from several elected Indian Act chiefs, but none from hereditary chiefs.

This sparked blockades of CN rail lines in several communities including near Belleville, Ont.

This morning the Ontario Provincial Police moved against the Mohawks of Tyendinaga, who have been blocking rail traffic at the site for over two weeks

With files from Tori Weldon

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