New Brunswick

Chantel Moore's family plans funeral, seeks answers

Martha Martin was supposed to be planning a celebration of the accomplishments of her daughter Chantel Moore. Instead, she's planning a funeral for the 26-year-old shot and killed by an Edmundston Police Force officer during a wellness check in the early hours of June 4.

Private funeral planned on Thursday followed by marches Saturday

Chantel Moore, 26, was fatally shot by an Edmundston Police Force officer early June 4 during a wellness check. Police allege she threatened the officer with a knife. (Chantel Moore/Facebook)

Martha Martin was supposed to be planning a celebration of the accomplishments of her daughter Chantel Moore. 

Instead, she's planning a funeral for the 26-year-old shot and killed by an Edmundston Police Force officer during a wellness check in the early hours of June 4.

"It's a pain that I'd never wish to inflict on any person," Martin told Radio-Canada on Tuesday evening.

Edmundston police allege Moore left her apartment with a knife and threatened the officer on a balcony. The officer then shot her. The family has questioned the police account. 

Quebec's independent police investigation agency, the Bureau des enquêtes indépendantes, is investigating the officer's actions. The agency says it could take months before its report is complete. 

Martin said she's been in touch with an investigator but declined to comment on what happened. 

Family of First Nations woman shot and killed by Edmundston police prepares funeral, seeks answers

CBC News New Brunswick

7 months agoVideo
3:23
The family of Chantel Moore, a 26-year-old First Nations woman shot and killed by an Edmundston Police Force officer during a wellness check last week, is preparing for her funeral and trying to understand what happened before her death. 3:23

"I'm sure every one of use would love to know what happened that morning," Martin said while standing near the site of the shooting alongside family members. "Are we ever going to get the full truth? She's not here any more to defend herself."

Moore was born in Edmundston but moved to B.C. as a small child and grew up in Nanaimo and Port Alberni, her family said. Moore had recently moved back to Edmundston to be closer to her mother and her daughter, Gracie.

Martin said it's unimaginable to have to plan the funeral for a child in the place they were born. 

"My heart hurts more because she has a six-year-old daughter who will never see her mom, she'll never get to see her daughter grow up, never get to see her graduate, never get to see her accomplishments," Martin said.  

Martin said Moore wanted to become an engineer and move to New York City. 

"She had big dreams," her mother said. "And in a split second, those dreams came to an end."

Martha Martin says her daughter Chantel Moore was hoping to become an engineer. (Radio-Canada)

About a dozen family members arrived from British Columbia on Monday to support Martin and to also look for answers. 

A small private funeral is planned for Thursday. 

Healing marches have also been planned in Edmundston, Fredericton and Moncton on Saturday at 1 p.m.

Edmundston police have said the force won't provide further interviews as the Quebec investigation continues. The force previously said non-lethal force was not attempted. Its officers are not equipped with body cameras. 

CBC News has permission from Chantel Moore's family to use the photos included in this story.

With files from Geneviève Normand and Shane Fowler

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