New Brunswick

Former premier Brian Gallant lands job at Ryerson University in Toronto

New Brunswick's former premier has a new job as a special adviser on innovation, cyber security and law in the president's office at Ryerson University in Toronto.

Gallant says he will continue to serve as MLA for Shediac Bay-Dieppe

Brian Gallant, the former premier of New Brunswick, has a new job at Ryerson University in Toronto. (Photo: Radio-Canada)

Former New Brunswick premier Brian Gallant has a new job at Ryerson University in Toronto.

Gallant confirmed in a statement Wednesday that he will serve as a special adviser on innovation, cyber security and law in the university president's office.

The university says Gallant will help provide insight and guidance for its new law school. 

Gallant remains Liberal MLA for Shediac Bay-Dieppe.

CBC News requested an interview with Gallant on Wednesday, but only a statement was provided. His statement said he remains "honoured to fulfil my duties" as MLA. He said he was "excited" to be offered the opportunity at Ryerson. 

"Helping the university build a law school and look at how to improve access to justice throughout Canada are projects that I also look forward to contributing to moving forward," Gallant said.

Started in spring

His role began this spring, the university said in a statement. 

Mohamed Lachemi, the university's president, had an "introductory meeting" with Gallant on March 5 this year, according to Ryerson University board of governors meeting minutes.

It's not clear if the position is a paid role or how much time it would involve. The university said it wouldn't comment on human resources matters and Gallant did not provide an interview. 

Gallant told reporters in December 2018 that he would remain as MLA for the short term. (Shane Magee/CBC)

The Members' Conflict of Interest Act requires MLAs who hold outside employment to disclose it to the province's integrity commissioner.

The disclosure must be made after taking office and in yearly updates. Any "material change" in the information must be disclosed within 30 days. 

The content of MLA disclosures is kept confidential. The commissioner's office declined to comment. 

"I will keep the Integrity Commissioner apprised of any opportunities I consider or accept," Gallant said in the statement. "There will be no employment opportunity accepted by me without the explicit approval of the Integrity Commissioner."

Wasn't clear about future

Gallant graduated from the University of Moncton with a bachelor of arts in business administration and bachelor of law degrees. He later graduated from McGill University in Montreal with a master's in law. 

He served as premier from October 2014 to November 2018. 

In December 2018, Gallant told reporters he would stay on as an MLA "for now," but wouldn't say if he would remain in office until the next provincial election.

As premier, Gallant told then-Liberal MLA Donald Arseneault to choose between staying in office and a job lobbying for a national labour union. Gallant cited the perceived conflict between Arseneault continuing to attend caucus meetings and a job influencing Liberal government decisions. Arseneault later resigned.

Gallant's time in the premier's office ended when the Progressive Conservatives led by Blaine Higgs formed a minority government.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Shane Magee

Reporter

Shane Magee is a Moncton-based reporter for CBC. He can be reached at shane.magee@cbc.ca.

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