New Brunswick

Brazil's Marta comes to Moncton for FIFA Women's World Cup

The all-time leader in goals in Women's World Cup play comes to Moncton on Wednesday night as the city hosts its final match in group stage play in the FIFA event.

All-time leader in Women's World Cup goals leads Brazil into action against Costa Rica

Brazil's Marta, right, celebrates after scoring against Korea Republic during the second half of a FIFA World Cup game in Montreal on Tuesday. (Graham Hughes/The Canadian Press)

The all-time leader in goals in Women's World Cup play comes to Moncton Wednesday night as the city hosts its final match in group stage play in the FIFA event.

Brazil forward Marta scored on a penalty kick in a 2-0 win over South Korea last week, giving her 15 goals in World Cup competition since 2003.

This is Marta's fourth World Cup as she also competed in 2003, 2007 and 2011. 

Marta, 29, won the FIFA player of the year award an unprecedented five consecutive times between 2006 and 2010.

Moncton venue manager Stéphane Delisle was at the Moncton airport Tuesday to greet Brazil to the city.

"It was pretty exciting," said Délisle.

"Among them was Marta who's recognized as one of the best in the world. The young boys and girls who were there were not disappointed as she did indeed sign some of their soccer jerseys and soccer balls and stuff.

Brazil has won both of its games so far in the 2015 World Cup and will advance to the next round. Costa Rica has tied both of its games to date and has two point in Group E and currently stands in second place in that group.

"I think people are very much looking to see that matchup," said Délisle.

Spain and the Republic of Korea each have one point in Group E and they play on Tuesday night in Ottawa.

Brazil beat Costa Rica 1-0 Wednesday evening at the University of Moncton Stadium.

Brazil is scheduled to play in Moncton in the Round of 16, taking on the second place finisher in Group D at 2 p.m. on Sunday.

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