New Brunswick

'Infrastructure failure' causes boil order in Saint John

Saint John Water called a boil order for a residential area surrounding Rockwood Park Sunday night.

Boil order called for neighbourhoods surrounding Rockwood Park on Sunday

Residents in the affected area must bring their water to a rolling boil, let it boil for one minute, then let it cool before consuming it or using it to brush their teeth and wash vegetables that won't be cooked. (Submitted by Saint John Water)

Saint John Water called a boil order for a residential area surrounding Rockwood Park Sunday night.

In a news release, the utility identified 28 sections of roads and courts where residents must boil their water before consumption, citing an "infrastructure failure."

The areas affected are the following:

  • 1 – 416 Sandy Point Road
  • 10 – 20 Patricia Lane
  • 5 – 18 Kelly Lane
  • 9 – 45 Jack Street
  • 2 – 194 Anglin Drive
  • 4 – 6 Pidgeon Terrace
  • 14 – 16 Thornbrough Street
  • 49 -100 Thornbrough Street
  • 261 – 295 Thornbrough Street
  • 2 – 39 Parkwood Avenue
  • 71 – 153 Parks Street Extension
  • 1 – 345 Hawthorn Avenue Extension
  • 4 – 40 Matthew Lane
  • 3 – 55 Crow's Nest Lane
  • 4 – 8 Duncraggan Court
  • 11 – 50 Ravenscliffe Court
  • 62 Parks Street
  • 55 - 505 Mount Pleasant Avenue
  • 80 – 115 Burpee Avenue
  • 1 – 30 Mount Pleasant Court
  • 39 – 108 Gooderich Street
  • 22 – 80 Rocky Terrace
  • 6 – 70 Highwood Drive
  • 55 Lake Drive (Lily Lake Pavilion)
  • 0 – 26 Kiwanis Court
  • 248 – 256 Somerset Street
  • 3 – 23 Corkery Street
  • 185 – 284 Cranston Avenue

Businesses and homes in the affected areas must bring their tap water to a rolling boil, let it boil for at least one minute and let it cool before using.

Areas marked in blue are where a boil-water order has been in effect since Sunday night. (Submitted by Saint John Water)

Or alternatively, use bottled water.

"Boiled or bottled water should be used for drinking, brushing teeth, making ice, juice, coffee or tea, or washing vegetables that will not be cooked," the release said.

However, it's safe to use the water without boiling for showers, bathing and swimming pools, as well as using it in the dishwater or to hand wash dishes in hot, soapy water.

Low-chlorine levels means there could be more bacteria in the water. That could cause diarrhea, cramps, nausea, headaches, or other symptoms. This could be especially harmful to "infants, young children, some of the elderly and people with severely compromised immune systems."

The release said if people experience any of these symptoms, they may want to seek medical advice. 

It's not clear how long the boil order will be in effect. The release said boil water order notices are being hand delivered to those affected.