New Brunswick

Beaverbrook Art Gallery unveils long-awaited new works, renovations

The Beaverbrook Art Gallery in Fredericton estimates it welcomed 1,000 visitors to its official reopening Saturday. The gallery was closed for two years.

Gallery estimates 1,000 people visited on Saturday

John Leroux is the gallery's manager of collections and exhibitions. (Mrinali Anchan/CBC News)

The Beaverbrook Art Gallery in Fredericton estimates it welcomed 1,000 visitors to its official reopening Saturday.

"I feel great that the gallery is open … it feels like all our old friends are back and it's the way we're meant to be," said John Leroux, the gallery's manager of collections and exhibitions.

The gallery was closed for just over two years in order to make upgrades to the building and for the addition of new works. 

One of the major changes is the 63-year-old building's facade, which has expanded closer to Queen Street with a new entrance.

Beaverbrook Art Gallery reopens with new look

3 months ago
Duration 1:50
After extensive renovations, the Beaverbrook Art Gallery in Fredericton has reopened to the public with six new exhibitions.

Leroux said the gallery looks much different now. The walls are painted in bright colours and there are six new exhibitions. 

One of those features works by renowned Quebec painter Jean-Paul Riopelle.

The Beaverbrook Art Gallery estimates it welcomed 1,000 visitors Saturday as it officially reopened after two years. (Mrinali Anchan/CBC News)

It's titled Riopelle: The Call of Northern Landscapes and Indigenous Cultures, and contains 180 paintings, drawings, prints, ceremonial objects and archival documents.

"To have these works here is a real privilege," said Leroux. "They're of international importance." 

The Beaverbrook Art Gallery is the only eastern Canada venue for the exhibition, which was borrowed from the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts.

Other newly added exhibitions include Larry Fink vs. Gary Weekes: The Boxing Portfolios, Len and Cub: a queer history, and Cathy Ross: Ministers Island in Small Pieces.

Leroux said some of the works came from Montreal, France and from the Museum of Modern Arts in New York. 

The gallery now features six new exhibits. (Mrinali Anchan/CBC News)

"It's a really big deal," he said, "The exhibitions we have now are wonderful, they're astounding in fact." 

Leroux said art is especially important through the pandemic, because it provides a sense of hope and a reminder that the world is a beautiful place.

 

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