Montreal

Montreal wants your take on its zero-waste plan

The City of Montreal has launched a public consultation about its plan to go zero-waste by 2030 — a target it says is ambitious but not impossible.

City wants to reduce waste by 70% in 5 years and be fully zero-waste by 2030

Multicoloured heirloom tomatoes sit next to cucumbers and carrots wrapped in plastic at the Jean-Talon Market. The city intends to eventually bar grocery stores, schools and hospitals from throwing out organic waste. (Elias Abboud/CBC)

The City of Montreal has launched a public consultation about its plan to go zero-waste by 2030 — a target it says is ambitious but not impossible.

Last year, more than 900,000 tonnes of waste was produced on the island of Montreal.

Four years ago, only 40 per cent of waste was recycled. The goal is to increase that to 70 per cent by 2025.

It also wants to encourage what it calls a circular economy — where discarded materials would be repurposed more than once before ending up in a landfill — and reduce food waste. 

A bylaw to ban single-use plastics is expected next spring.

"We have to think outside of the box to see if there are good practices outside of Montreal to improve the way it can be put in place," said Valérie Patreau, an Outremont borough councillor who also heads the city's commission for the environment and sustainable development.

Part of the plan focuses on communication, and better informing citizens about the benefits of reducing waste.

Patreau says the city is looking into new ways to reach and teach citizens about the benefits of waste reduction so they can do their part.

The second part of the consultation will be in January, when citizens and groups will present their briefs to the commission.

Those who want to speak during the public hearings have until Dec. 4 to register online. Written briefs can also be submitted by email.

with files from Antoni Nerestant

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