Yves Bolduc, Quebec education minister, quits politics

After series of missteps and public apologies, Quebec Education Minister Yves Bolduc announced he's leaving provincial politics to return to his medical practice.

Bolduc will get $150K transitional allowance package upon departure from National Assembly

Former Education Minister Yves Bolduc, left, announces his decision to resign as Quebec Premier Philippe Couillard looks on. (Jacques Boissinot/The Canadian Press)

Quebec Education Minister Yves Bolduc has announced he's leaving provincial politics. 

"I took the personal decision to return to my medical practice," Bolduc said in a brief statement to reporters Thursday morning, while standing alongside Premier Philippe Couillard.

"It was my own decision."

Couillard said he accepted Bolduc's decision "with sadness" and thanked him for his service.

He will receive a transitional allowance package worth approximately $150,000.

Bolduc, the Liberal MNA for Jean-Talon, a riding in the Quebec City region, was given the education dossier by Couillard in April 2014

During his short tenure, Bolduc was embroiled in a number of controversies, most recently for stating he had no problem with high schools strip searching students.

Bolduc also came under fire for saying schools don't need more library books, and for receiving a $215,000 bonus while working as a doctor for 19 months between political appointments.

He had previously served as the province's health minister between 2008 and 2012.

Bolduc departure comes after a week of speculation over a possible cabinet shuffle in the province's National Assembly.

Earlier this week, Couillard had refused to confirm rumours of Bolduc's departure, but hadn't done much to put an end to them either.

On Tuesday, Couillard did not answer directly when asked if he still had confidence in his education minister.

"I'm very happy with the way with the government is working right now," he said.

There was no immediate word on Bolduc's replacement, though a cabinet shuffle was expected by Friday.

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