Bridge at corner of Sherbrooke and Berri St. to get $8.2M facelift

The city is planning to invest $8.2 million in redoing the Sherbrooke Street bridge that straddles Berri Street and connects the Plateau-Mont-Royal to Ville-Marie.

City plans to add pedestrian-friendly space on top with benches, trees

A sign reminds commuters that work on the bridge that straddles Berri Street begins July 30. During construction, one lane of traffic each each way will remain open but the path will be inaccessible for some periods at night. (Kim McNairn/CBC)

Editor's note: We've reposted this story because this construction project begins today, July 30. Another route to add to your list of areas to avoid, perhaps?


The city is planning to invest $8.2 million in redoing the Sherbrooke Street bridge that straddles Berri Street and connects the Plateau-Mont-Royal to Ville-Marie.

The makeover will begin in August, and will include a beautification of the interior of the tunnel and a public space above.

The space above the bridge will be made more user-friendly with benches, plants and trees. (GR7 Architecture)

Built in 1955, the underside of the bridge was repaired in 2004 but the city says there's more work to be done on the top and to the retaining walls which haven't been updated since it was first put in.

During construction, one lane of traffic each each way will remain open but the path will be inaccessible for some periods at night. Work is expected to be complete in November 2019.

The aesthetic redesign will include putting large red stripes on the interior walls, improving lighting and planting trees and putting benches in the pedestrian area.​

The intersection redesign will include the addition of decorative red stripes on the interior of the tunnel. (GR7 Architecture)

That isn't the only facelift coming for the area. The STM says it intends to complete work on Berri-UQAM and Sherbrooke Metros between 2021 and 2025.

This will include the excavation of the intersection at Berri and Cherrier Streets.

With files from Radio-Canada's Romain Schué