Protesters brave deep freeze for Women's March in Montreal

The movement began in 2017 as a form of resistance to Donald Trump's U.S. presidency. Since then, women have come together every year to highlight issues of misogyny, transphobia and racism.

Despite the cold, hundreds of people came out to push for change Saturday

Simi Bhagwandas was one of many who attended the Women's March in Montreal during the deep freeze on Saturday. (Arian Zarrinkoub/CBC)

Despite the deep freeze, hundreds of protesters came out to mark this year's Women's March in Montreal.

According to Environment Canada, temperatures in Montreal reached a low of –23 C on Saturday afternoon.

The movement began in 2017 as a form of resistance to Donald Trump's U.S. presidency. Since then women have come together every year to highlight issues of misogyny, transphobia and racism. 

Jeanne Caron said she is encouraged by the turnout at the event despite the weather. (Arian Zarrinkoub/CBC)

Jeanne Caron is one of many protesters who came out to make their voices heard and push for change.

"Even though it's cold, the fight for women's rights is never over," she said. "I think it's beautiful that we can get together even though it is –30 C. It shows hope."

Caitlin Yardley said she wanted to join the movement to help put an end to sexual violence. (Arian Zarrinkoub/CBC)

The march in Montreal took place in solidarity with sister marches going on across the world, including one in Washington, where hundreds of thousands marched toward the White House. 

"We are here. We are here with our sisters in Washington, no matter the climate. We are here. We are here for the resistance and it's powerful. It's really powerful," said another protester, Caitlin Yardley.

Sonja Matschuck wanted to get involved to set an example for her daughter. (Arian Zarrinkoub/CBC)

Sonja Matschuck told CBC that she wanted to take part in order to "advocate for those who cannot speak."

"I am also the mother of a young girl and it is important for her to know that we need to change things," she said.

With files from CBC's Arian Zarrinkoub