Topic: real talk on race

Point of View

Celebrating Manitoba stories brings Black History Month to life

This year, I asked for and was given the opportunity to tell stories of black Manitobans who are making history right now, and it has really reinvigorated me, Ismaila Alfa writes.

Sixties Scoop adoptee recounts growing up in Jewish Montreal family

My parents chose me out of a catalogue of First Nations children. It was the trend in 1970 to offer First Nations children to non-Aboriginal homes — a government imposed initiative which has become known as "the 60's scoop."

Where visible minorities live in Montreal

Hover over the municipality or borough to see its top three visible minorities living there.
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3 young Quebec filmmakers talk about diversity

As part of the project Real Talk on Race CBC Montreal's arts program, Cinq à Six invited three young Montreal filmmakers from different backgrounds to talk about what they're working on, their challenges, successes and concerns in the context of contemporary Montreal culture.

Exploring the lack of diversity in Quebec police forces

Quebec's provincial police academy doesn't have "a lot of influence" over whether visible minorities apply to become officers, says a spokesman for the academy.

Police forces fail when not reflective of diverse population, activists say

If police forces don't reflect the diversity of the population, they can't properly do their job, says Mahad Al Mustaqim, who works with at-risk youth on Montreal's West Island.
INTERACTIVE

Quebec's police forces still overwhelmingly white

Quebec's population may be increasingly racially diverse — but that's not reflected in police hiring. The SQ stands out: Just five of 735 officers hired in nine years are from "cultural communities."

Chinese or Canadian? One Montrealer's identity crisis

I remember my first identity crisis like it was yesterday. I was about eleven years old and watching a Habs game. The Canadians scored. I cheered. My parents asked who was winning. “We are!” I said. My parents laughed. “That’s not us. We’re Chinese.”
Interactive

City of Montreal falls short on visible, ethnic minority hiring targets

The City of Montreal admits it's still short of its goal of hiring a third of new employees from Montreal's visible minority or ethnic communities.

Real Talk on Race: How transracial adoptees find their identity

For adoptees Kassaye MacDonald and Manuelle Alix-Surprenant, growing up in Quebec was a happy experience. But as transracial adoptees from Ethiopia and South Korea, growing up in white families and predominantly white neighbourhoods made for a complex relationship with their racial identity.

Does resumé whitewashing work?

If Lamar J. Smith and L. James Smith have the same qualifications and apply for the same position, who is more likely to get called back for an interview?
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Real Talk on Race: 'We need to keep having these conversations,' says Emilie Nicolas

Emilie Nicolas talks to CBC Montreal's Debra Arbec about inclusion and diversity in Quebec.

5 'Real Talk on Race' stories that got you talking on Facebook

This week, CBC Montreal launched its two-week series 'Real Talk on Race.' Since then, you've been joining the conversation on Facebook, Twitter, and by email. Here are five 'Real Talk on Race' Facebook posts that got you talking with some of your comments.
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Real Talk on Race | Point of view

As part of our series Real Talk on Race, CBC Montreal asked 10 people to share their personal stories about race. These stories are in their own words.

Feeling like a stranger in your own backyard

Gage Diabo got his first real taste of life outside the reserve when he began attending CEGEP in Montreal. But he soon began to feel like a stranger in his own backyard when he overheard the hurtful and ignorant things people would say about his community.

The need for mentorship as a woman of colour

As a single mother, PhD student, and woman of colour, Rachel Zellars says her ability to to succeed and be happy is closely tied to the mentorship she has received — mentorship that she believes women of colour owe to one another.
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Iraqi journalist finds peace and acceptance in Montreal

Hussein Al Hilli and his family landed in Montreal 24 years ago. Since then, Al Hilli says he's found tolerance and understanding.
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Sixties Scoop still not well-recognized, aboriginal adoptees say

The history of aboriginal children being adopted into non-aboriginal families is still not well-known in Quebec, despite class-action lawsuits launched in other provinces and mentions in the Truth and Reconciliation Report Commission report.
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Model minority myth: Can positive stereotyping ever be a good thing?

"You're Asian, you must be good at music, you should be good at martial arts, you should be good at school." Those are some of the stereotypes dentist Glen Hoa heard as a young Montrealer of Vietnamese descent. But what some call positive stereotyping can also be seen as harmful.

How one Inuk man's parka connects him to his community

Back home in the North, Stephen Puskas didn't think much about his parka. But when he walked around Montreal, it gave him a sense of a belonging in a community that's spread out across the city.
Audio

Real Talk on Race: Life after the Sixties Scoop

Daybreak speaks with two survivors of the Sixties Scoop, Nina Segalowitz and Lionel Kalisky, about what it was like to be among the 20-thousand First Nations, Inuit and Metis children who were taken from their homes and put up for adoption.

Growing up as the white minority

As a child in Sub-Saharan Africa, Coltrane McDowell was very aware of his own "whiteness." In Montreal, where his skin colour made him less conspicuous, he became more and more aware of the role his minority status played in his life.

The weight of the veil: One Muslim Montrealer's perspective

I never decided to stop wearing the veil, I just didn't have the energy to continue wearing it at the time. I myself wanted a bit of my anonymity and didn't feel like being the object of media debates all the time.
Analysis

Why teach history? The battle over Quebec's high school history curriculum

Why teach history? Is it to build common ground? Or is it to keep an ear open to voices long excluded from the mainstream? The debate kick-started after CBC News obtained a copy of Quebec's proposed high school history curriculum.
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How does race affect you in your daily life?

Alain Bastien and Zeeta Maharaj join Shawn to talk about work, CVs, cars and prejudices - as part of the Real Talk on Race series.

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