Montreal·Photos

The power is out for thousands of Quebecers, but the view outdoors is surreal

People living on Montreal's North Shore woke up Tuesday to an icy wonderland outside their windows.

Mother Nature covers Laval, North Shore in icy wonderland

Chloe, left, and Mila woke up in Terrebonne this morning to find their neighbourhood looking like the movie Frozen. They say they are 'ice princesses' for the day. (Vince Lacroce/Facebook)

People living on Montreal's North Shore woke up Tuesday to an icy wonderland outside their windows.

Some areas got more than 10 millimetres of freezing rain, knocking down power lines and cutting electricity to more than 300,000 Hydro-Québec customers at the peak of the storm.

While many are in the dark, commuters could be seen pulling over on the roads — to snap pictures of the surreal views.

Here is what Montreal's North Shore looks like today.

Send your photos to webquebec@cbc.ca.

Just last week, the temperatures hit the double digits. On April 9, it's below zero with ice and snow in the forecast. (Charles Contant/CBC)
The trees in the western part of Laval are coated in ice. (Sabrina Marandola/CBC)
It's really bad in Blainville, says resident Joshua Radu. 'Can’t get gas or food, no stop lights and Hydro trucks from Ontario.' (Joshua Radu)
Sunday versus today, in Lachute (Tina Chapman/Facebook)
In Laval, branches and power lines in residential neighbourhoods are coated with a thick layer of ice. (Kate McKenna/CBC)
It may officially be spring but the weather isn't quite ready to co-operate. (Charles Contant/CBC)
It was 'duck weather' earlier this week in Montreal's Maisonneuve Park, but the rain quickly turned to freezing rain. (Charles Contant/CBC)
The weight of the ice knocked down these power lines in Laval. Across Quebec, more than 300,000 Hydro customers lost electricity due to the icy weather. (Mathieu Wagner/Radio-Canada)
Much of eastern Ontario was hit with a mix of rain, freezing rain, ice pellets and snow yesterday evening and overnight. (Kate McKenna/CBC)

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