Montreal

Slowdowns of up to 40 minutes coming for some Exo suburban transit users

Commuters who use the Exo public transit network are being forewarned that between now and 2023, they should expect longer commutes because of the construction of the new Réseau express métropolitain (REM) light rail network.

Quebec, Caisse de dépôt invest $192M to keep train users moving during REM's construction

Expected to be completed in 2024, the $6.3-billion Réseau express métropolitain (REM) will connect downtown Montreal, the South Shore, Trudeau Airport, the West Island and the North Shore. (Réseau express métropolitain )

Commuters who use the Exo public transit network are being forewarned that between now and 2023, they should expect longer commutes because of the construction of the new Réseau express métropolitain (REM) light rail network.

On Thursday, the consortium building the REM delivered its plan to ease the strain on users of Exo, which combines all train, bus and adapted transit services on Montreal's north and south shores.

The minister responsible for the greater Montreal region, Chantal Rouleau, said she understands the strain the added commuting time will put on workers, students and families.

"I fully share these concerns," she said.

Rouleau is asking employers to be flexible when commuters start being affected by the slowdowns.

To help the situation, Rouleau said that the government is investing $192 million to take steps to keep Exo commuters moving.

Some of those measures include reserved bus lanes and shuttle buses.

Work on the REM line has already forced Exo to cancel four trains on the Deux-Montanges line and shift departure times on 23 trains. From 2020 to 2022, parts of the line will be shut down entirely, affecting 15,000 users, the consortium said.

Specific bus stop locations, routes and timetables will be presented in the fall.

Here's an overview of what Exo commuters can expect in different sectors.

South Shore sector from 2019 to 2021

  • A reserved bus lane.
  • Travel time to downtown is not expected to increase.
  • Travel time from downtown to Panama stop will increase by up to six minutes.
  • Travel time from downtown to Chevrier stop will increase by up to 10 minutes. 

Canora/Mont-Royal area from 2020 to 2022

  • More bus service along the Metro's Blue and Orange lines.
  • Rail commuters in the area can expect their 10-minute travel time to Central Station to increase by up to 25 minutes.
  • The consortium is currently assessing other ways to lessen travel time in the sector.

Côte-Vertu area (Bois-Franc, Du Ruisseau, Montpellier stations) from 2020 to 2022

  • More buses, shuttle buses between stations, reserved bus lanes, priority traffic lights.
  • Commuters using this line can expect up to 25 minutes to be added to their travel time.

Mascouche Line area from 2020 to 2022

  • More buses at Montreal stations and on the Green line, shuttle buses, a reserved bus lane, priority traffic lights.
  • Up to 15 minute increase in travel time.

Deux-Montagnes and Laval area from 2020 to 2023

  • Shuttle buses, a reserved lane and priority lights to Côte-Vertu station.
  • From 2020 to mid-2021 an increase of up to 40 minutes to travel time.
  • Complete shutdown of Deux-Montagnes line in mid-2021.
  • Estimates currently being assessed from mid-2021 to 2023.

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.

Become a CBC Member

Join the conversation  Create account

Already have an account?

now