Montreal

Remembrance Day marked across Quebec

Quebecers paused to remember the military men and women who gave their lives in the service of Canada as Remembrance Day ceremonies took place across the province.

Remembrance Day 2014 commemorates 100 years since beginning of WW I

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      Quebecers paused to remember the military men and women who gave their lives in the service of Canada as Remembrance Day ceremonies took place across the province. 

      Ceremonies this year took on a more poignant tone as 2014 marks 100 years since the beginning of the First World War.

      It also falls just weeks after Canadian servicemen Patrice Vincent and Nathan Cirillo died in separate attacks on Canadian soil. 

      In Montreal, the main ceremony took place at the McGill University campus.

      "I'm glad to see so many people turn out," said Jason MacCallum, a former military reservist. "I think it's the largest crowd I've seen in years actually out today."

      In St-Jean-sur-Richelieu, about 1,500 soldiers and observers took part in an emotional commemoration.

      The city south of Montreal is where Warrant Officer Patrice Vincent was run over and killed in a deliberate attack in October.

      Some officers said the mood at their base has changed since Vincent died, and he was on their minds during the ceremony.

      At the end of the ceremony, soldiers and cadets from the Royal Military College in Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu laid their poppies, one by one, at the cenotaph.

      In Pointe-Claire on Montreal's West Island, about 200 people gathered at the Field of Honour military cemetery.

      People at the ceremony placed their poppies in front of large photos of Vincent and Cirillo.

      Marking the end of the Great War

      Ceremonies to mark Remembrance Day originally began to commemorate the end of the Great War — the First World War.

      More than 650,000 men and women from Canada and Newfoundland served in the war.

      Approximately 66,000 died and 172,000 were wounded.

      Over the years, Remembrance Day has become the day where Canadians honour those who died in any of the armed conflicts in which Canada was involved.

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