Montreal

Quebec's test positivity rate highest since May as COVID-19 infections climb

While the number of new COVID-19 cases in Quebec remains low when compared to the peak of the third wave, the test positivity rate hit 1.4 per cent on Sunday. That’s the highest it's been since late May.

Quebec analyzed 11,202 tests on Sunday, 1.4% came back positive

People wait to be tested for COVID-19 at a clinic in Montreal on Sunday. Quebec public health reported 154 new infections on Monday. (Graham Hughes/The Canadian Press)

While the number of new COVID-19 cases in Quebec remains low when compared to the peak of the third wave, the test positivity rate hit 1.4 per cent on Sunday.

That's the highest it's been since late May, and new public health data shows infections are on the rise.

Quebec has reported an average of 139 new cases a day over the past seven days, up from an average of 57 a week prior.

Quebec Public Health reported 154 new cases of COVID-19 on Monday and 347 new infections were identified on Friday and Saturday.

There have been no new deaths attributed to the disease since Thursday but there are 61 COVID-19 patients in hospital — of those, 17 are in intensive care.

Dr. Donald Vinh, an infectious diseases specialist at the McGill University Health Centre, told The Canadian Press that the current trends are concerning as they show "there is still ongoing community transmission."

The increased rate is based on fewer tests, he said.

On May 31, Quebec recorded a test-positivity rate of 1.5 per cent based on 15,783 tests. While on Sunday, Quebec analyzed only 11,202 tests.

With that data in mind, Vinh said the concern lies in the future, as schools and university classes resume in late August  and September.

"If it's already increased when we are in the 'safe' outdoors," he said, "what's going to happen when we're in the indoors?"

Quebec's public health institute reported that 84.6 per cent of residents 12 and up have received at least one dose of vaccine while 68 per cent are adequately vaccinated.

Delta variant stirs worldwide worry

Meanwhile, health officials in the United States are sounding the alarm over the rapid spread of the delta variant which is described as extremely contagious, even among vaccinated people. It may also cause more serious disease than earlier coronavirus strains.

"High viral loads suggest an increased risk of transmission and raised concern that, unlike with other variants, vaccinated people infected with delta can transmit the virus," said Rochelle Walensky, head of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC) in a statement last week.

On Friday, the CDC released data from a study of an outbreak in Massachusetts in which it said three-quarters of those infected had been fully vaccinated. 

Quebec has reported an average of 139 new cases a day over the past seven days, up from an average of 57 a week prior. (Jean-Claude Taliana/Radio-Canada)

The CDC recommends that Americans wear masks in areas with substantial transmission "regardless of vaccination status."

The highly contagious variant, which was first discovered in India in late 2020, has spread around the world and now accounts for the majority of cases in Canada and various other countries. 

As of late July, the delta variant accounted for about five per cent of new cases in Quebec, compared to nearly 90 per cent of new cases in Ontario. 

For now, Quebec is continuing to scale back restrictions. For example, bars and restaurants are now officially allowed to serve alcohol until 1 a.m.— one hour longer than what was previously allowed. 

Stadiums, venues and festivals can welcome 15,000 spectators outdoors, up from 5,000.

The details on all changes can be found here.

with files from The Canadian Press

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