Montreal

Quebec MNA walks out of legislature after being criticized for wearing a hoodie

Québec Solidaire MNA Catherine Dorion chose to leave the National's Assembly's blue room on Thursday morning because her clothing — an orange hoodie — was deemed inappropriate by some of her colleagues.

Quebec Solidaire's Catherine Dorion left after colleagues complained about her attire

Catherine Dorion at the National Assembly on November 7, 2019. (Radio-Canada)

Québec Solidaire MNA Catherine Dorion chose to leave the National's Assembly's blue room on Thursday morning because her clothing — an orange hoodie — was deemed inappropriate by some of her colleagues.

Some MNAs asked the president of the National Assembly, François Paradis, to intervene because they believed the representative from Taschereau did not respect the decorum and dress code given at the opening of parliamentary proceedings.

When QS co-spokesperson Gabriel Nadeau-Dubois informed Dorion of the complaints, she decided to leave.

"We told Catherine this, and she was distressed," said Nadeau-Dubois. "Because she wanted to avoid the issue being blown out of proportion, she decided to leave."

Dorion was spotted wearing the exact same orange hoodie during debate in the National Assembly on Sept. 25.

QS MNA Catherine Dorion wore the same orange hoodie in the blue room on Sept. 25, 2019 without incident. (Screenshot/National Assembly)

This is only the latest spat over Dorion's attire and decorum since her election in 2018.

Dorion has defended her work attire publicly, which has included tank tops, boots, tuques and running shoes.

She also made headlines last week when she posted a photo of herself sitting on a desk in the legislature's red room — a chamber reserved for official ceremonies — "dressed up" as a politician in business attire with the words "Happy Halloween."

MNA Catherine Dorion was criticized by the Liberals last week for posting a "Happy Halloween" photo online where she said she dressed up as a politician for the occasion. (Facebook)

That prompted an ethics complaint from the opposition Liberals.

With files from Radio-Canada and The Canadian Press

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