Montreal

Missing and murdered indigenous women: Quebec report calls for more police training

"We need to be interested in indigenous women before they are missing or murdered," says Alana Boileau, co-ordinator of the Quebec Native Women's Association.

Report by Quebec Native Women's Association highlights reasons indigenous women go missing

A woman holds up a sign in support of aboriginal women following allegations against police in Val-d'Or, Que., earlier this year. A new report from the Quebec Native Women's Association says police officers need more training. (Sandra Ataman/Radio-Canada)

A group representing First Nations women in Quebec says more needs to be done to ensure they stay safe.

In a report released Monday, the Quebec Native Women's Association looked at the reasons indigenous women go missing in the province.

Alana Boileau, the group's co-ordinator, said those include the legacy of residential schools, suicide and domestic violence. 

"We need to be interested in indigenous women before they are missing or murdered," she said.

"And this includes the quality of services that are available to them, their relationship with the police in their communities and in urban areas."

The report says police officers need better training to work with indigenous women and understand their concerns. 

It also says better social services are needed to help indigenous women deal with their problems.

For the report, the organization spoke with than 40 people, including indigenous women, their families and people who work with them.

The report comes ahead of the federal inquiry into missing and murdered indigenous women.

It's expected to get underway this spring.

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