Montreal

The Laurentians are booming, new Quebec migration numbers show

Quebec has released its latest data on migration patterns within the province and it shows more people are heading for suburbs in the Laurentians and Montérégie.

People within Quebec choosing to move to bedroom communities in Laurentians, Montérégie

Between July 2014 and July 2015, about 190,000 Quebecers moved to different regions of the province. (Graham Hughes/The Canadian Press)

Quebec has released its latest data on migration patterns within the province and it shows more people are heading for suburbs in the Laurentians and Montérégie.

A report from the Institut de la statistique du Québec shows that between July 2014 and July 2015, the region that saw the greatest growth was the Laurentians.

Its migration figures went up 0.87 per cent, which translates into a gain of roughly 5,000 people.

Meanwhile, Quebec's North Shore area (Côte Nord) saw the greatest population loss: a decline of 1.42 per cent, or 1,339 people.

Montreal loses people to bedroom communities

The giant gains in the Laurentians and Lanaudière regions came at the expense of Montreal.

The city's population saw a net loss of 14,583 people. Its surrounding regions of Laval, Lanaudière, the Laurentians and the Montéregie picked up a total gain of 12,898 new residents.

The report shows that about 190,000 thousand Québecers moved to different communities between July of 2014 and July of 2015.

The data also highlighted that, overall, there was less migration in the province from previous years.

The author of the report, Martine St-Amour, said the aging population is one general factor that accounts for less migration. But across all age groups, fewer people are moving to different regions. Several factors could account for that including the job market, the housing market and post-secondary training. 

(Institut de la statistique du Québec)

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