Montreal

Quebec home daycare workers begin rotating strike as talks set to resume this week

The group representing daycare workers says it will launch general strike later this month if no agreement is reached.

Workers' federation will launch general strike later this month if no agreement is reached

Home daycare workers in Quebec want better wages, among other demands. (Charles Contant/CBC)

Ten thousand home daycare workers in Quebec are launching a rotating strike today, as negotiations between their union and the province have failed to produce a deal.

The group representing the workers, the Fédération des intervenantes en petite enfance, says the first of several one-day walk-outs will start today in the Quebec City and Chaudière-Appalaches areas and end Sept. 18 in the Laurentians and Montérégie regions.

Representatives for the workers and the Quebec government met Monday afternoon and said talks would continue on an unspecified date later this week.

Home daycare workers in Quebec want better wages, among other demands.

Quebec Families Minister, Mathieu Lacombe, said last week he hoped to come to an agreement to avoid a strike. They have been in negotiations for more than a year. 

The workers' federation says it plans to launch a general strike on Sept. 21 if no deal is reached before then.

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