City of Montreal asks for citizens' help in developing universal accessibility plan

The public consultation process will give citizens the opportunity to contribute to the city’s developing plan for universal accessibility for 2019-2020.

Public consultations will take place in meetings, on the phone and online between Oct. 15 and Nov. 30

Montreal has long been criticized by advocates for its lack of universal accessibility, city officials are working to change that. (Shutterstock)

In a bid to make the city easier to navigate for people with disabilities, City of Montreal officials will be hosting a public consultation over the next two months to give citizens the chance to contribute.

"We want to hear from you about our future action plan for universal accessibility, currently being developed by our municipal services," says Coun. Rosannie Filato in a city-issued press release, Thursday.

"Our priority is the full participation of all Montrealers in the life of our city," added Filato, who serves as the executive committee member responsible for social and community development.

The public consultation will take place between Oct. 15 and Nov. 30. There will be an online survey and citizens will be able to send emailed suggestions. Information on how to participate will be available on the city's website.

Participants with limited vision will have access to voice-activated software and other services.

Coun. Rosannie Filato serves as the executive committee member for social and community development. (Radio-Canada)

Six scheduled meetings will be held in various boroughs ranging from Saint-Laurent to Ville-Marie throughout November. Those meetings will have sign language interpretation.

The meetings will be in French, but the city says a bilingual facilitator will be on hand to ensure English speakers can participate in developing a renewed plan.

Accessibility advocates have long been critical about Montreal's infrastructure and transit.

Montreal has access ramps on only 40 per cent of its municipal buildings. Of Montreal's 68 Metro stations, 13 are equipped with elevators. The transit service has set goal of making 32 stations accessible to people with various disabilities by 2022. 

Montreal's new plan serves as a sequel to the city's 2015-2018 plan which was launched by former Mayor Denis Coderre.

With files from Radio-Canada