Montreal

Parking, beer, hydro: Here's what's going up in price in Montreal in April

The days are getting longer. The weather's getting warmer. But April also means some price increases for Montrealers.

The fine for some parking tickets will more than double, if city council approves the hike on April 15

Quebec has raised the minimum price of beer sold in grocery stores and dépanneurs. (Justin Tang/The Canadian Press)

The days are getting longer. The weather's getting warmer. But April also means some price increases for Montrealers.

Hydro-Québec rates are going up across the province, by a little less than one per cent. For an average home, that's about $13 per year.

Protesters gathered at Phillips Square today to denounce the increase, arguing that the profitable public utility should not be raising rates at all while some Quebecers already can't afford their power bills.

And if you drink beer, you will see the price go up.

The government body regulating alcohol, gaming and horse-racing in the province has raised the minimum price of beer sold in grocery stores and dépanneurs.

Depending on the alcohol concentration of the beer, the increase is between two and 2.3 per cent.

For example, the minimum price of a six-pack of 5.5-per-cent Molson Dry is now $6.61.

Parking tickets in Montreal will soon cost more, too.

City council will vote on April 15 on hiking the cost of parking infractions.

If the vote goes through, parking in a prohibited area will soon cost you $78 per ticket — a 26 per cent increase. Parking illegally in reserved lanes will more than double to $302 — up from $150.

Also, read those no-parking signs carefully — seasonal parking restrictions come into effect today to allow for city streets to be cleaned.

If you see prices go up at the pump, however, don't blame the federal carbon tax.

Since Quebec has its own carbon-pricing system, that law does not apply here.

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