Montreal·Q&A

Meet the host of CBC Montreal's new afternoon radio show Let's Go with Sabrina Marandola

The new show launches Tuesday starting at 3 p.m.

Starting on Tuesday, Montrealers can tune into a new show on CBC Radio One from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m.

Journalist and Montrealer Sabrina Marandola will be at the helm of Let's Go. The show will delve into issues that are important to Montrealers and stories about people making a difference in their communities. (CBC)

Montrealers can tune into a brand new afternoon radio show on CBC Radio One called Let's Go with Sabrina Marandola starting September 3.

Marandola is a longstanding journalist with CBC Montreal.

The program, which replaces Homerun, will broadcast from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m ET on CBC Radio One in Montreal.

We sat down with Marandola to talk about what listeners can expect from the new show, and what she loves most about her city.

What excites you the most about Let's Go?

I am absolutely thrilled I get to host a show that will shine a spotlight on the diverse people, places and voices of this amazing city.

I was born and raised in Montreal. As someone who is very active in her own cultural community, local neighbourhood and community stories have always had a special place in my heart. 

What are Montrealers going to hear when they tune in next week?

Marandola said that as a daughter of Italian immigrants, giving a voice to Montreal's diverse communities is a priority for her. (CBC)
This is going to be a show that will leave people feeling informed and upbeat about their city.

I think many people are tired of being inundated with bad news. Let's Go will delve into the important issues we all care about, but will bring you stories of people who are trying to find solutions and make a difference.

We'll continue to offer the latest news and traffic to get you through your afternoon, and our new show features a dedicated transportation columnist, Akil Alleyne. Akil will be out and about, talking to commuters and answering listeners' questions about their commute. 

Meanwhile, longtime listeners will continue to hear some familiar voices.

Our sports reporter Douglas Gelevan will be live with us every game day in the city, our music columnist Duke Eatmon will keep bringing listeners new tracks.

What's your favourite thing about Montreal?

The number of pizzerias!

I am a pizza addict and I love Montreal's pizza scene — and its food scene in general. I also love its multiculturalism.

Growing up the daughter of immigrants, and speaking three languages in the same sentence, I could not imagine calling anywhere else home.

How are you prepping for talking for three hours straight every day?

This will sound odd, but my new regimen will include drinking a lot of water. When hosting in the past, I noticed my voice starts to go after the second hour if I am not well hydrated.

Wish me luck, because I don't really drink much water!

Where do you look when you want to know what's happening in the city?

I usually get the best story ideas when I'm out and about, running errands or just hanging out with friends. It's the best way to discover what's on people's minds.

I also peruse social media to see what people are talking about and I love reading local community papers to see what's shaking in our neighbourhoods.

Who is your favourite broadcast host of all time?

That's very difficult to answer. I grew up watching Peter Mansbridge and a couple of years ago, I got to do live TV hits with him on his last day on the job. He was such a pro, but also so encouraging. It was a rewarding experience.

I've always looked up to Heather Hiscox as well, whom I consider to be the queen of "going live."

Finally, a personal mentor of mine is Bernard St-Laurent. He's sharp, warm, has such a strong connection with people and, of course, he has the best laugh.

You can follow Let's Go with Sabrina Marandola on Twitter.

 

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