Montreal

NDG residents push back against attempt to plant trees in front of their homes

There was something of a standoff in Notre-Dame-de-Grâce on Thursday, as some residents refused to allow municipal workers to plant trees in front of their homes.

Borough has goal of planting 700 trees per year, but some residents are seeing red

Resident Antonio Nitti said he doesn't want a big tree in front of his home. If he has to have one, he wants it to be small and inconspicuous. (CBC)

There was something of a standoff in Notre-Dame-de-Grâce on Thursday, as some residents refused to allow municipal workers to plant trees in front of their homes.

The area where the trees are supposed to go looks like it's part of the residents' property, but it actually belongs to the city.

The trees are being planted as part of the borough's green initiative to put in 700 trees each year.

Some residents on Oxford Avenue say they support the idea of trees being planted in the borough, but felt caught off guard by the measure on Thursday morning.

Municipal workers were out Thursday planting trees along Oxford Street in NDG, but some residents refused to allow them to plant near their yards. (CBC)

"We have small gardens in the front. So we just want a bit of notice before and to be consulted," said resident Bruna Roti.

"I would like someone to actually come and prove to me that this will not be a hindrance to my hydro lines here. How big is it going to grow? I want some information about this tree."

Some residents sat on the land where the trees were intended to go, refusing to allow workers to continue planting.

Resident Bruna Roti told CBC she would have wanted to be consulted before workers showed up with the trees ready to plant. (CBC)

Faced with this opposition, the crews left around noon on Thursday. But the conflict isn't over.

Borough Mayor Sue Montgomery told CBC News that it's important to get those trees in the ground.

"I'm open to working with the residents. This is the first I heard of it, so we'll see if we can work out some kind of compromise," she said.

With files from Sean Henry

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.