Montreal

Public health issues another warning after measles case in Montreal

An individual is believed to have contracted the illness while on a trip to Paris.

Doctors urged to keep an eye out for possible cases anytime between now and May 25

The number of reported cases around the globe has quadrupled in the first three months of 2019 compared to the same period last year, according to the World Health Organization. (Associated Press)

Montreal public health has issued another warning of possible measles exposure after an individual is believed to have contracted the illness while on a trip to Paris.

The individual, who had not been vaccinated, flew home April 26 and went to a medical clinic twice, before going to hospital on May 1, the warning says.

The person was also at a Montreal school during the incubation period, which is an average of seven to 14 days.

Public health says a booster vaccine has been offered at the school and that people who may have been in contact with the infected person have been contacted.

Officials are also urging doctors to keep an eye out for possible cases anytime between now and May 25.

This is the third warning related to measles issued by Montreal public health in 2019.

What are the symptoms?

Measles is highly contagious and is most often spread when people first get sick or before they know they have measles.

Symptoms include fever, cough, runny nose, stuffy nose, red and watery eyes and tiny white spots in the mouth.

Two to four days after the onset of symptoms, a rash including pimples and red spots appears, first on the face, then on the trunk, arms and legs, for three to seven days.

Measles can cause serious health complications such as pneumonia and encephalitis (inflammation of the brain), which can cause seizures, brain damage or death.

Complications are more common in people with weakened immune systems, pregnant women and children under one year of age.

The World Health Organization says that the number of reported cases around the globe has quadrupled in the first three months of 2019 compared to the same period last year.

In 2017, there were 110,000 measles deaths globally, mostly among children under the age of five, the WHO says.

The measles vaccination resulted in an 80 per cent drop in measles deaths between 2000 and 2017 worldwide.

For more information on Quebec's vaccination program, visit the provincial government's website

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