Montreal man pleads guilty to murdering his mother, grandmother

A Montreal man pleaded guilty today to two counts of first-degree murder for the deaths of his mother and grandmother, telling the judge he’s not sorry about it and would probably do it again to other relatives.

Christian Pépin, 35, tells judge if he is let out of prison, other family members may be next

Christian Pépin, 35, was arrested in December and charged with the stabbing deaths of his mother and grandmother. (Radio-Canada)

A Montreal man pleaded guilty today to two counts of first-degree murder for the deaths of his mother and grandmother, telling the judge he's not sorry about it and would probably do it again to other relatives.

"I have no empathy for my family. Maybe once I'm out, they will be next. Is that clear enough?," Christian Pépin shouted during an outburst in the courtroom.

The 35-year-old was arrested in December and charged with the deaths of his mother Diane Champagne, 55, and his grandmother Paulette Robidoux, 75.

The two women were found stabbed to death in Montreal's Mercier-Hochelaga-Maisonneuve borough.

Pépin has a long criminal history including other violent crimes.

At the time of his guilty plea, Pépin said he had been the victim of incest.

He said he "took care of justice" himself, and yelled insults and threatened members of his family who were in the courtroom.

His relatives left the courtroom in tears, while security guards approached him to try to calm him down.

He told Justice Marc David that he was abused during his childhood at the hands of his mother.

"I did the same thing to her that she did to me when she would come into my room," he said.

Pépin said he also blamed his grandmother for turning a blind eye to a pedophile in the family entourage.

After the murders on the night of Dec. 3, 2017, Pépin is the one who called 911.

No parole before 50 years?

First-degree murder carries an automatic sentence of life in prison, with no possibility of parole before 25 years.

But a new article added the the Criminal Code in 2011 allows the Crown to ask that the convicted person serve the sentences for two murder convictions consecutively, meaning that parole would not be possible before 50 years.

If the Crown asks for that and the court agrees, "that probably means that he will die between the prison walls," said Justice Marc David.

Pépin answered that he did not want to be released because there is a risk he may go after other family members.

The Crown is expected to state on March 5 whether or not it will request that Pépin serve his sentences consecutively.

With files from Radio-Canada's Geneviève Garon