Montreal·Video

Montreal-based filmmaker Meryam Joobeur gets Oscar nomination

Her short film, Brotherhood, tells the story of a Tunisian father from the countryside who is "torn between his loyalty to his family and his moral principles," according to a news release. 

Her short film, Brotherhood, tells the story of a Tunisian father from the countryside

Director Meryam Joobeur accepts the Short Cuts Award for Best Canadian Film for the film "Brotherhood" during the 2018 Toronto International Film Festival Awards Ceremony in Toronto on Sunday, September 16, 2018. (Tijana Martin/The Canadian Press)

Montreal-based director Meryam Joobeur has been nominated for an Oscar for her short film, Brotherhood. 

The film tells the story of a Tunisian father from the countryside who is "torn between his loyalty to his family and his moral principles," according to a news release. 

It's nominated in the best live action short film category.

Joobeur is a Tunisian-American filmmaker who graduated from Concordia University's Mel Hoppenheim School of Cinema. 

The director says she uses her diverse background to "explore ramifications of the Islamic State in the most remote regions of Tunisia." 

The Montreal-based director of Brotherhood discusses her Oscar-nominated short film, breaking stereotypes and giving 'a very human perspective about our reality.'   5:45

"This moment resonates beyond just my life and filmmaking as a first nomination for my country of origin Tunisia," Joobeur said in a statement. 

Joobeur said she hopes the film gives a human perspective about the reality of the Muslim and Arab world, and breaks stereotypes. 

"I grew up in the U.S. after 9/11," she said. "I saw firsthand the shift of perspective about the Muslim or Arab world. And it was really heartbreaking for me."

Brotherhood was selected at Sundance and TIFF, where it won best Canadian short film. It has won more than 60 awards in 48 countries.

with files from CBC News Network

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