Montreal

Mirabel passenger terminal to be demolished

Aéroports de Montréal says it’s going ahead with the demolition of the old passenger terminal at Mirabel, despite the wishes of town officials to convert it into a convention centre.

Mirabel Mayor Jean Bouchard furious abandoned airport terminal won’t be converted into a convention centre

The last time this passenger terminal in Mirabel was used was in 2004. (CBC Archives)

Aéroports de Montréal says it’s going ahead with the demolition of the old passenger terminal at Mirabel, despite the wishes of town officials to convert it into a convention centre.

On Tuesday the ADM’s board of directors authorized two contracts to be awarded for work related to the decontamination and dismantling of the building.

The last passenger flight out of Mirabel, which is located about 60 kilometres north of Montreal, was 10 years ago.

Since then, many ideas have circulated about what to do with the passenger terminal.

Mirabel Mayor Jean Bouchard wanted to see it converted into a convention centre, adding that he commissioned studies which found the idea to be cost-effective.

They are arrogant. The plan makes absolutely no sense.- Jean Bouchard, Mirabel Mayor

ADM’s CEO James Cherry said that’s not true.

"It's a building that was difficult to convert.  It's a building that was built as an aircraft terminal and to convert a building that was built that way was going to cost too much money."

Cherry said converting the terminal would cost anywhere between $25 million and $35 million, whereas the demolition will cost less than $15 million.

He also added that it would be easier for someone who wants to buy the land to build their own new building suited to their needs.

Bouchard is furious with ADM’s plans to go ahead and tear down the terminal.

“They are arrogant. The plan makes absolutely no sense,” Bouchard said, adding that the board has a moral obligation to respect the wishes of the town.

Cherry said he has all the legal authority he needs to go ahead with the demolition.

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