Montreal

Meadowbrook land will be preserved green space

The land of the Meadowbrook Golf Course, situated in Montreal’s west end, will remain a green space.

Montreal Mayor Denis Coderre says land will be zoned as recreational, no condos to be built

The Meadowbrook property, a 57-hectare green space, will be zoned as recreational land next week. (CBC Archives)

The land of the Meadowbrook Golf Course, situated in Montreal’s west end, will remain a green space.

Today Montreal Mayor Denis Coderre announced the 57-hectare green space will be re-zoned as recreational.

“I think it's the right thing to do. Every time we have the opportunity to raise the percentage of green space, I think it’s the good thing to do,” he said.

Activists and developers have been fighting over the land for 25 years.

Parts of the century-old golf course in southwest Montreal were targeted for condominium development by Pacific Group Canada.

The company, which owns the land, said it hoped to build an environmentally friendly project with 1,500 condo units on the half of the property that falls under Lachine's jurisdiction.

Pacific Group Canada is already suing the city after an earlier plan to build housing was quashed.

Meadowbrook was considered for protection in 2004, but the city of Montreal said it did not fit the criteria at that time.
However, city officials said it's their right to zone the land as they see fit.

“I can't imagine that the owner of that land is necessarily enchanted with this decision, but it's the right decision. It’s a courageous one,” said Russell Copeman, executive committee member in charge of urban planning.

“It's very, very, very good news,” said Campbell Campbell Stuart, a member of the group Friends of Meadowbrook.

“This is a really, very good day — to hear the mayor and Russell Copeman state so clearly that basically come hell or high water, we are going to keep Meadowbrook green.”

The re-zoning of the land is expected to take place next week.

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.