Montreal

Ottawa to compensate Marylène Levesque's family after she was murdered by parolee

Marylène Levesque, 22, who had been working at an erotic massage parlour, was found dead the Quebec City suburb of Sainte-Foy on Jan. 22. Eustachio Gallese turned himself into police in connection with her death.

Levesque was found dead in a hotel room last January

Marylène Levesque, 22, who had been working at an erotic massage parlour, was found dead in a hotel room in the Quebec City suburb of Sainte-Foy on Jan. 22. (Marylène Levesque/Facebook)

The Correctional Service of Canada and the Parole Board of Canada will compensate the family of Marylène Levesque, who was murdered by a parolee last January, Radio-Canada has learned.

An out-of-court settlement was recently reached after the two federal agencies were threatened with legal action, Radio-Canada reports.

The terms of the settlement and the amount to be paid will not be disclosed due to a confidentiality agreement. Levesque's family declined to comment.

Levesque, 22, who had been working at an erotic massage parlour, was found dead in the Quebec City suburb of Sainte-Foy on Jan. 22.

Eustachio Gallese turned himself into police in connection with her death. The 51-year-old was on day parole after being convicted of the murder of his wife in 2004.

Gallese later pleaded guilty to first-degree murder and was sentenced to life in prison with no chance of parole for 25 years.

Since the events, Levesque's friends and family have raised questions about how Gallese was allowed such freedom.

In particular, the Parole Board was roundly criticized for having allowed Gallese, in agreement with Correctional Service Canada, to attend erotic massage parlors.

The federal correctional service then announced the opening of a joint internal investigation with the parole board.

Pierre Tabah, a lawyer specializing in correctional law, told Radio-Canada that he is surprised an agreement was reached so quickly.

Government agencies often avoid going public in court, but will fight lawsuits when they think they are right.

"It makes me say, from what I have seen in the past, that there are troubling elements — there are elements for which it is much better to settle with the family than to go further," Tabah said.

The Correctional Service of Canada and the Parole Board of Canada both declined to comment on the matter.

Based on a report by Radio-Canada

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