Montreal

Lev Tahor sect denied right to appeal child-removal order

Quebec Superior Court has denied the ultra-Orthodox Jewish sect Lev Tahor the right to appeal a decision rendered last November that ordered 14 children be returned to Quebec to be placed in youth protection services.

Quebec Superior Court judge rules that the 30-day period to file an appeal was not respected

Lev Tahor members' request for an appeal is rejected Friday in Quebec Superior Court. (Radio-Canada)

Quebec Superior Court has denied the ultra-Orthodox Jewish sect LevTahor the right to appeal a decision rendered last November, which ordered 14 children be returned to Quebec to be placed in youth protection services.

Justice LucLefebvre ruled that the 30-day period to file an appeal had not been respected, and therefore the judgement rendered could not longer be appealed under youth protection laws.

Last November, about 200 members of the sect fled their homes in Sainte-Agathe-des-Monts, Que. in the middle of the night and moved to Chatham, Ont. — all while Quebec youth protection officials were preparing to withdraw some children from their families.

Quebec’s youth protection officials, as well as provincial police, had been investigating for years after allegations of neglect and abuse.

Lev Tahor community leaders have always denied any wrongdoing.

Another appeal filed

This week, Lev Tahor members filed another appeal — this time against the ruling of an Ontario judge.

Earlier this month, an Ontario court ruled to uphold a Quebec’s court’s decision that 13 children be placed with foster families.