Montreal

Parents can't shop around for teachers who don't wear religious symbols, Legault says

Premier François Legault says parents will have to live with the teacher their children get for now, including those who wear religious symbols.

About 50 parents sign open letter saying they don't want people wearing religious symbols teaching their kids

Quebec Premier François Legault says parents don't have the right to seek out teachers who don't wear religious signs. (Graham Hughes/The Canadian Press)

The Quebec government says parents do not have the right to shop around for school teachers.

This follows an open letter from about 50 parents in the Montreal newspaper, Le Devoir, yesterday that they don't want their children taught by teachers wearing religious symbols.

They're calling on the government to respect their children's rights to a secular education.

Quebec's Bill 21 requires public servants such as teachers and police officers to remove religious symbols at work.

But employees can keep wearing their symbols if they were hired before the law went into effect last June.

Premier François Legault says parents will have to live with the teacher their children get for now, including those who wear religious signs.

He says there will be a gradual change, considering all the new teachers won't be able to wear the symbols.

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