Montreal

Laval wants national standards for dangerous dogs

The City of Laval wants Ottawa to make changes to the Criminal Code of Canada to create uniform rules across the country to deal with the problem of dangerous dogs.

City will lobby federal government to make more explicit reference to responsibilities of dog owners

Laval mayor Marc Demers said Tuesday he will ask Ottawa to amend the criminal code to deal with dangerous dogs. (Elysha Enos/CBC)

The City of Laval wants Ottawa to make changes to the Criminal Code of Canada to create uniform rules across the country to deal with the problem of dangerous dogs.

Right now, it's possible to charge owners of dogs who attack people with criminal negligence, but it rarely happens.

Laval Mayor Marc Demers said Wednesday that the article in the Criminal Code dealing with criminal negligence should be amended to make specific reference to the responsibilities of dog owners.

"We would like the federal government to do its homework, so it would be all across Canada the same thing, it won't change from city to city," Demers told CBC News.

"That way, across the country, if you bring up your dog to be vicious so he may attack somebody, you are responsible for that."

No charges have been laid yet in the case of a pit bull that attacked and killed a woman in Montreal last month.  

Police are still investigating.

Laval city council also passed a resolution Tuesday night asking its own bureaucrats to draw up new bylaws that target owners of dangerous dogs.

Province-wide pit bull ban?

Municipalities across Quebec have introduced a spate of new rules targeting pit bulls and dangerous dogs since last month's fatal attack.

Longueuil city council passed a ban on pit bulls Tuesday night. The ban will take effect next week.  

Montreal is planning a similar ban.

Premier Philippe Couillard has said he would "probably" follow Ontario's lead and pass a province-wide ban on pit bulls.

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