Montreal

Julie Snyder and Pierre Karl Péladeau tie the knot in Quebec City ceremony

Parti Québecois Leader Pierre Karl Péladeau and TV host Julie Snyder tied the knot at a star-studded wedding ceremony in Quebec City on Saturday.

Guest list included Quebec's top political and cultural celebrities

Parti Québecois Leader Pierre Karl Péladeau and TV host Julie Snyder tied the knot at a star-studded wedding ceremony in Quebec City on Saturday.

Minutes before the ceremony, Péladeau said he was more nervous about saying "I do" to his longtime partner than he was to pose his first question in Quebec's National Assembly.

"I barely slept … I have to admit, I'm really nervous," said the billionaire-turned politician.

As anticipated, he rolled up to the church on a tandem bike with his son, Thomas.

Snyder's appearance, while more conventional, also made a statement — she arrived in a Tesla electric car.

Quebec City Mayor Régis Labeaume officiated the ceremony for the couple, who have two children together. Around 400 guests were invited to the nuptials, including the entire Parti Québecois caucus. Singer Céline Dion recorded a special message for the couple.

"I call it the royal wedding. It's beginning to feel like that," said Lise Ravary, a columnist and blogger for the Journal de Montréal.

The guests were served a vegetarian menu and Quebec wines priced at under $20 a bottle.

"What are they trying to say with this? That they are ordinary folks? He is a billionaire and she's a millionaire, and they're serving a $16 wine to make a statement?" Ravary said.

"I don't know if they're trying to send a message ... With Pierre Karl Péladeau and Julie Snyder, you never really know when the personal becomes political and when the political becomes personal."

Fans lined up outside the Musée de l'Amérique francophone in the hopes of catching a glimpse of the power couple.

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