Montreal

New Île-aux-Tourtes bridge won't have room for REM, at least for now

The Quebec government has confirmed plans to build a new Île-aux-Tourtes bridge connecting Montreal to the off-island suburbs west of the city.

Bridge used by 83,000 vehicles per day commuting from increasingly dense western suburbs

The Réseau express métropolitain (REM) is slated to open at the end of 2023, connecting Montreal's North and South shores to the West Island and downtown. But some off-island suburbs are feeling left out. (Réseau express métropolitain)

The Quebec government has confirmed plans to build a new Île-aux-Tourtes bridge connecting Montreal to the off-island suburbs west of the city.

Chantal Rouleau, the province's junior transport minister, said the bridge will have three lanes in each direction, in addition to reserved bus lanes and a multi-use lane for cyclists and pedestrians. 

There is nothing planned in connection with the light-rail project. But Rouleau said the new bridge will be planned to potentially accommodate light-rail technology in the future.

"Who knows what will be the technology in five years, in seven years, in ten years," she said.

The province will hold public consultations on the bridge later this month in Senneville and in Vaudreuil-Dorion.

Ground has already been broken on the REM, and it is set to be completed by 2023.

The REM will extend as far west as Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue, but for off-island commuters, that will still mean driving over the frequently congested bridge that connects them to the island.

About 83,000 vehicles use the Île-aux-Tourtes bridge daily.

With files Elias Abboud

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