Montreal·Video

Truck gets wedged under Guy Street overpass — the third in 2 months

Yet another truck got stuck under the Guy Street overpass overnight. This was at least the third time in about two months that a truck has become lodged under the railway overpass.

Overpass has several signs indicating trucks are prohibited

Police cordoned off the street, blocking traffic until the truck could be removed. (Alain Béland/Radio-Canada)

For the third time in about two months, a truck got stuck underneath the Guy Street overpass late Tuesday.

The driver wasn't hurt, but the top of the truck's container was damaged.

The overpass is located at the Argyle Avenue intersection, just north of St-Antoine Street. The truck has since been removed and the road is open to traffic.

The overpass has a yellow sign on both the north and south sides of the street marking it as having 3.7 metres of clearance, whereas the average semi-trailer reaches about 4.1 to 4.2 metres.

In this case, the driver was headed north just before midnight, meaning he passed under a measurement sign with flashing yellow lights that is attached to the overpass. 

There are also signs at St-Antoine Street — on both the east and west corners — warning drivers of the height limitation. Below each measurement sign, there is another that prohibits trucks from using the street.

The overpass is struck regularly despite Montreal's efforts to post signs and install sensors that warn drivers of the danger.

For southbound drivers, a digital panel, controlled by sensors, lights up when trucks approach the overpass.

The collisions often snarl traffic and cause commuter train delays as the overpass needs to be inspected for damage before it is reopened.

In this video, we see other times the overpass has been hit in the past 2 months:

A truck got stuck underneath the Guy Street overpass during the night.

4 years ago
Duration 0:55
The driver was headed north just before midnight, meaning he passed under a measurement sign with flashing yellow lights that is attached to the overpass.

 

With files from Radio-Canada

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