Montreal

Ethics course exemption rejected by Quebec court

A group of Quebec parents seeking a legal exemption for their schoolchildren from a controversial ethics course have lost their bid in court.

A group of Quebec parents seeking a legal exemption for their schoolchildren from a controversial ethics course have lost their bid in court.

In a ruling earlier this week, Quebec's Superior Court rejected a request from a coalition of Drummondville parents who believe the new ethics and religion course compromises their children's moral education.

Judge Jean-Guy Dubois said the parents' and children's right to freedom of religion is not being violated by taking the course, which was introduced last year to elementary and high schools by Quebec's Education Ministry.

The course replaces religion classes with a curriculum covering all major faiths found in Quebec culture, including Catholic, Protestant, Jewish and aboriginal beliefs.

Two more cases challenging the course are still pending.

A group of students in Granby who were suspended after boycotting the class have asked for a court injunction. Montreal's prestigious Loyola High School is also challenging the course, seeking a comprehensive exemption for all students at the Jesuit Catholic institution.

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