Montreal·Video

Escaped alligator spotted crossing the street in Montreal's Villeray neighbourhood

If you saw an alligator crossing Jarry Street on Sunday afternoon, you weren't imagining things.

If you saw an alligator crossing Jarry Street on Sunday afternoon, you weren't imagining things

The alligator was quickly captured by employees of the exotic animal company who were transporting it. (Mayssam Samaha/Facebook)

An alligator was spotted crossing Jarry Street East in Montreal on Sunday afternoon, after it escaped from a van parked nearby.

Police confirmed the reptile belongs to a company that puts on exotic animal demonstrations.

Employees were stopping for lunch in the area, police said, and accidentally let the alligator get away.

The animal made a break for it as the van's automatic door was closing.

It crossed Jarry Street near Chateaubriand Avenue and hid under a car, attracting some attention from pedestrians.

Mayssam Samaha was having a coffee with a friend in Villeray, sitting by the window, when she noticed the alligator.

"It took a few seconds for my brain to comprehend what was happening," she told CBC Montreal's Daybreak.

Her friend ran into the street to try and stop traffic to let the animal cross the street. Samaha shot some video on her cellphone.

She said the alligator was calm and moving very slowly — she remembers hearing at some point that when reptiles are cold, they don't move very fast — so she wasn't scared it would attack her.

Police said employees quickly captured the animal and returned it to the van before officers arrived on the scene. 

Initially Montreal police identified the animal as a crocodile. It is, in fact, an alligator.

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.