Montreal

4.0-magnitude earthquake recorded near Valleyfield

"It was a bang, and then the house shook for a second. It felt like something rolling by, [but] I knew immediately it was an earthquake," said Baie-d'Urfé resident David Leduc.

The quake was felt in parts of Quebec, Ontario, Vermont and New York

The quake was felt Monday morning about 29 kilometres southeast of Valleyfield, just south of the U.S. border. (Earthquakes Canada)

A 4.0-magnitude earthquake shook parts of southern Quebec and eastern Ontario Monday morning, according to Earthquakes Canada.

It was recorded at 5:38 a.m. and the epicentre was just south of the U.S. border, about 29 kilometres southeast of Salaberry-de-Valleyfield and 59 kilometres east of Cornwall, Ont.

There have been no reports of damage — earthquakes of that magnitude are often felt but rarely cause damage, says Earthquakes Canada.

The quake was felt from Rigaud to Montreal to Saint-Bruno, and in parts of eastern Ontario, New York state and Vermont as well.

"It was a bang, and then the house shook for a second. It felt like something rolling by, [but] I knew immediately it was an earthquake," said Baie-d'Urfé resident David Leduc.

Twitter users in the Montreal area described what they experienced:

Initially, the earthquake's magnitude was measured as 4.2, then it was revised to 4.0. 

Claire Perry, a seismologist and geophysicist with Natural Resources Canada, said the first report is produced automatically, then the data is examined more closely to properly nail down the quake's exact strength.

The area where the earthquake occurred is part of the Western Quebec Seismic Zone, she explained, and quakes of a similar magnitude generally happen every 10 years.

The zone has been the site of at least three significant earthquakes in the past. The most recent one, a magnitude 5.6 quake located between Cornwall and Massena, N.Y., happened in 1944 and caused damage evaluated at $2 million at the time.

She said anyone who felt Monday's quake should let Earthquake Canada know by reporting what they experienced.

with files from Radio-Canada's Tout un matin

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