Montreal

Earthquake, the dog found buried alive, had a brain tumour: autopsy

Earthquake, the dog found buried alive in a South Shore field last month, was suffering from a brain tumour, an autopsy has found.

But vet says cause of death still unclear from autopsy

Veterinarian Madjid Boussouira, who cared for the dog before he died, says people need to confirm with a veterinarian if they think an animal is dead. An autopsy has revealed the dog was suffering from a brain tumour and brain damage. (Salim Nadim Valji/CBC)

Earthquake, the dog found buried alive in a South Shore field last month, was suffering from a brain tumour, an autopsy has found.

But the exact cause of the dog's death is still unclear, according to Madjid Boussouira, the veterinarian who cared for the male boxer before he died.

"It could be heart failure or brain damage," Boussouira told CBC News Friday.

He said the autopsy, which was conducted by Université de Montréal specialists, also revealed brain damage, but no obvious signs of abuse or trauma. 

The damage could have been caused by seizures provoked by the tumour, he said.

Earthquake didn't suffer

The boxer, who was subsequently nicknamed Earthquake, was discovered last month by a passerby who heard whimpering and saw a paw sticking out from a field in Saint-Paul-d'Abbotsford, about 70 kilometres southeast of Montreal.

Earthquake was brought to Boussouira's clinic, where he was given medication, adrenaline, a breathing tube and a cardiac massage. But the dog died roughly a day after being rescued. 

"He didn't suffer," Boussouira said at the time.

The injured dog was heard whimpering by a man out walking in a field. He saw a paw sticking out of the ground and began digging. (Montérégie SPCA)

A man in his 40s was arrested by the Sûreté du Québec in the days following Earthquake's discovery, after he turned himself into a police station in Rouville, near Granby. 

He was released on a promise to appear and is expected to face charges of animal cruelty, the SQ said last month.

The SQ didn't immediately return calls Friday regarding the case. 

Boussouira said it's important for pet owners to confirm an animal's condition with a veterinarian and have it euthanized if no treatment is available.

With files from Salim Valji