Montreal

Denis Coderre denies Montreal mosques a hotbed of radicalization

Mayor Denis Coderre is downplaying concerns expressed by his Quebec City counterpart that Montreal's mosques are a hotbed for radicalization.

Quebec City Mayor Régis Labeaume claims radicalization occurring in Montreal mosques

Montreal mayor Denis Coderre stands next to Belgium consul Karl Dhaene, right, during a vigil on Wednesday at the Belgium Consulate in Montreal. (Paul Chiasson/Canadian Press)

Mayor Denis Coderre is downplaying concerns expressed by his Quebec City counterpart that Montreal's mosques are a hotbed of radicalization. 

Régis Labeaume told a news conference on Wednesday that the recent terror attacks in Brussels should prompt closer scrutiny of what occurs at places of worship in Quebec.

"There are one or several mosques where there is radicalization," Labeaume said, specifying the mosques in question weren't located in Quebec City.  

"It's more in Montreal," he said. "I don't want to intrude in Montreal's affairs, but as a Quebec citizen I have to say that radicalization is happening in places of worship. We can't accept that. We have to take action."

Upon hearing Labeaume's comments, Coderre said: "I'll let Régis worry about what's happening in his backyard."

While it is normal to have concerns following the Brussel attacks, the best response was not to resort to profiling, Coderre said.  

He added that radicalization now frequently occurs over the internet, as opposed to in mosques. He also pointed out the creation of the city's anti-radicalization centre has been a valuable resource for dealing with potential problems.

"We're giving ourselves the tools to go where its happening, because its often not happening in mosques," Coderre said.

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