Montreal

Kittens and cats scrapping for attention at crowded Quebec City animal shelter

The Quebec City Animal Protection Society is nearing its capacity to take in kittens and cats as the two heaviest intake periods — spring litters and moving day — coincided this year.

Late spring litters and moving day have shelters overrun with felines

Cats like Grisou are stuck at the Quebec City SPA until they are adopted and that means less room for new arrivals. (SPA de Québec/Facebook)

The Quebec City Animal Protection Society (SPA) is nearing its capacity to take in kittens and cats as the two heaviest intake periods — spring litters and moving day — coincided this year.

The shelter's administration suspects the reproduction cycle of cats in Quebec City shifted this year, with kittens being born far later than usual.

"We have all the cats that have been brought in when people move, which typically happens around July 1," said Felix Tremblay, president of the local SPA. "Those cats now have to compete for the public's attention with those kittens."

He explained that kittens are often adopted in just a couple days, while older cats often spend much more time in shelters.

"You wouldn't want to live in a cage for two months, and neither does a cat," he said.

The Quebec City SPA is running out of room and resources to take in more felines, and the cause of the surge in abandoned cats and kittens remains a mystery.

Tremblay suggested that maybe the late spring delayed the litters, but said he doesn't know for sure.

He said other SPAs in the province have experienced the same phenomenon, especially in Trois-Rivières and the Eastern Townships.  

Tremblay said that before adopting a pet, it's important to take stock of the responsibility that comes with it.

"You don't adopt an animal simply because it's cute, because an animal is going to outgrow that quite quickly," he said.

With files from Quebec AM