Montreal·Video

How to prepare your kids for a COVID-19 test

As the number of new cases reported in Quebec increases, the time may come when your child has to be tested for COVID-19. They might be anxious about that possibility, so we've asked an expert to explain how it works, using words children will understand.

We asked an expert to explain the testing process in a child-friendly way

Preparing kids for COVID-19 testing

CBC News Montreal

4 months agoVideo
2:26
It's slightly...uncomfortable, but nothing to be afraid of, the head of the Emergency department at the Montreal Children's Hospital assures. 2:26

As the number of new cases reported in Quebec increases, the time may come when your child has to be tested for COVID-19.

They might be anxious about that possibility, so we've asked an expert to explain how it works, using words children will understand.

Dr. Laurie Plotnick, director of the Montreal Children's Hospital emergency department, explains how kids can prepare for a trip to a testing centre.

Montreal public health is offering free tests for those who meet one of the following two criteria:

  • You have symptoms of flu, gastroenteritis or COVID-19, such as fever, a new cough or trouble breathing.
  • You have been in close contact with someone who has tested positive for COVID-19.

You can consult Montreal public health's list of testing centres to find the one closest to you.

Many are walk-in, but some require calling ahead for an appointment. However, be aware that recent high demand has caused delays. Some walk-in testing sites have seen people line up for hours before they open just to get a spot.

Bring your RAMQ card, or, if you do not have one, bring another form of government-issued identification.

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