Cirque du Soleil sale to U.S., Chinese investors made official

The sale of Cirque du Soleil to a group headed by a U.S. private equity firm and its Chinese partners has officially closed.

Cirque founder Guy Laliberte announced in April he was selling his majority stake

The sale of Cirque Du Soleil, the Montreal-based circus known for its spectacular acrobatic displays, has closed. (Luke MacGregor/Reuters )

The sale of Cirque du Soleil to a group headed by a U.S. private equity firm and its Chinese partners has officially closed. 

The federal government approved the application last month by TPG VII CDS Holdings, a global private equity firm, to acquire a majority stake in the 31-year-old famed circus after it was deemed an overall economic benefit for Canada.

Minority stakes go to Shanghai-based Fosun Capital Group and Quebec's Caisse de dépôt.

"With the assistance of our new partners, we have already begun laying the groundwork for the global expansion of the Cirque du Soleil brand, as evidenced by our recently announced growth plans in Asia," Daniel Lamarre, president and CEO of Cirque du Soleil, said in a statement on Wednesday.

"We look forward to working with TPG, Fosun and the Caisse for years to come, as we continue to bring Cirque's extraordinary artistic vision to audiences around the world."

The buyers have committed to maintain the Cirque's Montreal headquarters and ensure that at least 70 per cent of the Cirque's senior management in Canada is Canadian.

TPG will also provide annual progress reports to the federal government.

Cirque founder Guy Laliberte announced in April that he was selling a majority stake in the company he founded in 1984.

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