Montreal

Family of Montreal woman killed by dog to sue owner

The family of Christiane Vadnais, the 55 year-old woman killed by a dog in her backyard last June, says it intends to sue the owner.

'He doesn't even get a slap on the wrist,' says sister of slain Christiane Vadnais

Christiane Vadnais, left, pictured here with her daughter, died after being attacked by a dog last June. (Facebook)

The family of Christiane Vadnais, the 55 year-old woman killed by a neighbour's dog in her Pointe-aux-Trembles, Que.,  backyard last June, says it intends to sue the owner of the dog.

Lise Vadnais told Radio-Canada Thursday that her family felt it had no other option after Crown prosecutors announced last fall they wouldn't press charges against Franklin Junior Frontal, the owner of the dog named Lucifer, in the death of her sister Christiane.

"He doesn't even get a slap on the wrist — no fine, no community service, no charges," said Vadnais. 

"He continues his life as if nothing happened while our family lives a horrible nightmare."

Owner knew dog was dangerous, family says

After the attack, police said Frontal could possibly be charged with criminal negligence.

But in November Crown prosecutors said after a rigorous analysis of the case there wasn't enough evidence to lay charges.

Vadnais said she doesn't understand that decision.

She said investigators told her that the dog, which Montreal police initially said was a pit bull, had already bitten Frontal's cousin and that since then Frontal had always made sure the dog wore a muzzle if there were visitors in the house.

Lise Vadnais said it's unacceptable that the dog's owner doesn't even get a slap on the wrist while her family lives a nightmare. (Radio-Canada)

Frontal told police he left the dog inside the house that day and it's not clear how the dog was able to get outside.

But Vadnais said neighbours told the family the dog was often left alone in the backyard.

"When you have to muzzle your dog each time someone visits the house but you leave it outside all day that doesn't make any sense," Vadnais said.

"For us it's clear, the owner was very aware his dog was dangerous."

The family has sent a lawyer's letter to Frontal advising him of their intention to launch a lawsuit, she said.

With files from Radio-Canada

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