Montreal

Crown won't appeal case of Quebec man who killed wife with Alzheimer's

Michel Cadotte, 58, was sentenced to two years less a day in jail for smothering his wife Jocelyne Lizotte, who was in the late stages of Alzheimer's disease.

Michel Cadotte, 58, was sentenced to 2 years in jail for smothering Jocelyne Lizotte

Michel Cadotte, seen here arriving at the Montreal courthouse on May 28, 2019, was sentenced to two years less a day in jail for the killing of his wife, Jocelyne Lizotte. (Paul Chiasson/Canadian Press)

Quebec's Director of Criminal and Penal Prosecutions (DPCP) says it won't appeal the sentence of Michel Cadotte. 

Cadotte, 58, was found guilty of manslaughter and sentenced to two years less a day in jail for suffocating his wife, 60-year-old Jocelyne Lizotte, who was in the late stages of Alzheimer's disease.

"Following a rigorous review by experienced prosecutors on the appeal, the DPCP made the decision not to appeal the sentence," the DPCP said in a statement. The victim's family members have been informed of the decision, it said.

The Crown had sought an eight-year prison sentence for Cadotte.

Crown prosecutor Geneviève Langlois had argued that the sentence needed to be severe enough to send a message to society that it's not right to cause someone's death, even when that person is suffering, "because human life is sacred."

During sentencing arguments in March, the victim impact statements of Lizotte's family members left several people in the courtroom, including the judge, in tears.

Lizotte's two sons told the court Cadotte's decision to end their mother's life was an act of selfishness, rather than one of compassion.

Cadotte's defence team had sought a sentence of between six and 12 months, including the five months Cadotte spent in jail right after his wife's death. They said after the sentencing they were disappointed by the sentence, but they have not yet said if they will appeal it.

Elfriede Duclervil and Cadotte's other lawyer, Nicolas Welt, portrayed the accused as an exhausted caregiver. They argued their client's judgment on the day of his wife's death was clouded by a major depression and years of suffering.