Bob Bissonnette, killed in helicopter crash, left his mark on Quebec sports scene

The death of Bob Bissonnette, who was killed along with the pilot in Sunday's helicopter crash in Campbellton, N.B., has generated an outpouring of grief from former hockey teammates and fans.

Fomer QMJHL player and musician remember for his 'joie de vivre'

Bob Bissonnette played in the Quebec Major Junior Hockey League for the Hull Olympiques. (Gatineau Olympiques (formerly Hull Olympiques))

The death of Bob Bissonnette, who was killed in Sunday's helicopter crash in Campbellton, N.B., has generated an outpouring of grief from former hockey teammates and the baseball team in which he had an ownership stake.

Bissonnette, 35, died along with the pilot, Frederick Décoste.

Another passenger, the president of the Quebec City Capitales baseball team, Michel Laplante, was injured in the crash.

He's expected to be released from hospital in the coming days.

After a stint as a hockey minor-leaguer, Bissonnette settled in Quebec City, becoming a sales rep and eventually part-owner of the Quebec City Capitales baseball team.

"He wanted to make a life in sports when he retired from hockey. He saw an opportunity with the Capitales," Patrick Scalabrini, the team's manager, told CBC Montreal's Daybreak

Bob Bissonnette became a popular musical performer after retiring from hockey. (Bob Bissonnette/Instagram)

Bissonnette, was also a popular singer who regularly performed at venues around Quebec, was known for a "joie de vivre" that was "contagious," Scalabrini recalled.

Bobby Baril, director of sales for the team, said he "never saw him in a bad mood."

Bissonnette played for the Hull Olympiques and Acadie-Bathurst Titan in the Quebec Major Junior Hockey League and several other minor-league teams around North America before turning to music.

His website says he was about to go on tour.

Longtime NHL player Maxime Talbot, who played with Bissonnette on the Olympiques, paid tribute to his former teammate in a lengthy Facebook post.

"I would never have admitted it to you but I thought you were so cool, so tough. Hockey players don't cry, except for now and the day after you were traded from Hull to Bathurst and I found myself alone on the bench," he wrote in French.

"I'm still waiting for a message from you to tell me it was a stunt, a joke, a media technique, a marketing strategy for your next show."

The Transportation Safety Board has been called in to investigate the cause of the crash.

with files from CBC Montreal's Daybreak