Montreal

Woman with Alzheimer's found alive after 3 nights in dense Quebec forest

A 66-year-old woman with Alziehemer's has been found alive after she went missing three days ago in a sparsely populated, heavily wooded area northwest of Quebec City.

The 66-year-old woman went missing while picking wild blueberries Sunday

The woman went missing while picking wild blueberries with her husband, an activity they did almost daily. (Radio-Canada)

A 66-year-old woman with Alzheimer's has been found alive after she went missing three days ago in a sparsely populated, heavily wooded area northwest of Quebec City.

Provincial police said she had no obvious wounds and was transported to a nearby hospital, where they do not fear for her life. 

She was found in a pit on Wednesday. A dog trainer in the area happened across some footprints on the path he was walking.

The dog was then able to lead the trainer to her. The trainer heard her cries for help as he approached the pit. 

Police had been searching for her around La Tuque since Sunday evening using dogs, horses, all-terrain vehicles and a helicopter.  

Réjean Bouchard was picking wild blueberries with his wife, Denise Massicotte, when she disappeared. It's an activity the couple does almost daily during the summer, Bouchard said.

He said he took his eyes off his wife for only for a brief moment, but it was long enough to lose sight of her. He reported her missing at 5 p.m. Sunday.

"I looked everywhere for her but couldn't find her," Bouchard told Radio-Canada on Monday. "Alzheimer's, that's what it does. It's fast."

On Tuesday, police brought in reinforcements to help search the rugged terrain near La Tuque, which is about 140 kilometres from the capital. Trained volunteers and local security also took part.

The area, known as the Upper Mauricie region, is hilly and dense with trees.

Massicotte also went missing in October 2018, according to Radio-Canada. Provincial police found her, that time, within a few hours.

With files from Radio-Canada

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